School Day Care for a Fee

Is it feasible, or even allowable for an elementary school to offer full day “day care” for a fee which would supplement an existing 10 hour/week preschool program. If so, could this be an opportunity to increase school revenue and pupil count (currently many preschoolers do not take advantage of the free 10 hours because it is a logistical nightmare for working parents)?

  1. Great idea if the tuition more that covers the cost and the “state” must be kept out of it!

    Submitted on .
  2. As far as pre-school 10 hour free program….I would need more information.

    Submitted on .
  3. If offering a day care would be revenue generating, then yes. The idea should be considered if space is available. If there is even the slightest chance it will not generate revenue, then we can not afford that risk at this time.

    Submitted on .
  4. We looked at this a few years ago as we had the same situation. We approached a high quality local day care provider to offer space for them to offer a satellite program. It would have been a win/win for us, but we just did not have enough people willing to commit to using the care for it to be worthwhile for the provider. If all you offer is space the money/logistics, etc. are not your headache- just be sure it is a reputable provider -I would always check with your liability insurer first before finalizing any arrangements.

    Submitted on .
  5. While I have no direct experience with this, I would pursue it with my Superintendent with a serious eye towards offering the full day for two reasons: !) it’s good for kids and 2) good for parents.

    Submitted on .
  6. Perhaps the easiest solution for the problem of day care could be to arrange with a qualified day care provider a bus or shuttle service, which would be chaperoned with one of the staff members. There is such an arrangement with our elementary school and alleviates the logistical nightmare, with out taking on the additional cost of space requirements or modifications for day care, as well as the administrative costs and potential liabilities. I wouldn’t dismiss your idea outright, but I would tend to find an easier solution.

    Submitted on .
  7. Regarding pre-school rules, there is a very prescribed process that you will need to go through before you can start counting students as part of your ADM. Here is a link to the statute: http://www.leg.state.vt.us/statutes/fullsection.cfm?Title=16&Chapter=021&Section=00829. The VT Department of Education and DCF have developed rules that will guide your district on starting and/or expanding a program ­ check their website under Early education¹ for more information. You should definitely make sure that your superintendent is involved in this process. Good luck!

    Submitted on .
  8. Many school’s offer before and after school programs that can be subsidized through childcare financial assistance (formerly child care subsidy). Families in Berlin, VT utilize this program and they use the gym for space. If the school has extra classroom space, that would be wonderful. I’d also put a plug in here for Head Start. If a school has about 10 children who qualify for child care financial assistance, the local Head Start program might be able to supply the school system with a staff person to assist. Especially if the hours of the preschool sessions were at least 3 1/2 hours in length (the minimum for Head Start regulations).

    Submitted on .
  9. Let’s not turn our schools into day care facilities any more than they are now.

    Submitted on .
  10. Although I am in favor of new revenue streams, I have two issues with this. The first would be I am generally not in favor of a government entity competing with private business. This proposal could put many day-care providers out of business (I’m sure some could be used as a vendor of the school system). The second issue would be that I think it possible for the school to get involved into too many scenarios other than the traditional school setting. I realize the question is an example of what would be an natural progression but I am concerned that most (if not all) of our Districts are top heavy at the Administration levels (most of it brought on by mandates from the Fed) and I think this scenario might require more supervisory oversight thus potentially adding more expense to the already saddled districts.

    Submitted on .
  11. You have a Board of Health — state and/or local — whose job it is to assure the health and safety of community members (kids). Both the parents’ group and other interested groups (town and/or school officials) should begin with the Board of Health and require scientific comment. Avoid “frays”. Some folks love them, but Board members should eschew them.

    Submitted on .
  12. Most schools are already burdened with too many social-service obligations which detract from teaching-learning missions. Many of our programs accommodate parents who are overwhelmed with parenting. Many institutions may parent better than parents do. But should they? Should schools provide day care at all? It’s a social welfare issue. Because schools have accepted responsibilities which once were executed by churches, YMCAs, welfare agencies and others, perhaps we could go go all-out and provide such services on a demand-cost fee scale. An alternative approach would be to require parents to do their jobs instead.

    Submitted on .
  13. As far as the feasibility of offering day care, goes, a school would have to be a licensed child care program through the Child Development Division and follow their regulations as to numbers of children per adults, training regulations, etc. Many schools already offer licensed after school programs so it would be best to check with the local child care resource development specialist at your county’s child care support center (Family Center of Washington County, Lamoille Family Center Child Care Resources, etc.) to learn how to set this up. Revenue for hours past the 10 hours is being collected by schools in different areas of the state already.

    Submitted on .
  14. The agenda is usually set on Tuesday and the packet arrives on Saturday. This allows the Superintendent to develop a set of notes on the items on the agenda to explain those positions to the board.

    Submitted on .

Leave a Reply

Your name, school board and email address will not be published. They are required to verify the authenticity of the commentator. Required fields are marked *

*

You may use these HTML tags and attributes: <a href="" title=""> <abbr title=""> <acronym title=""> <b> <blockquote cite=""> <cite> <code> <del datetime=""> <em> <i> <q cite=""> <strike> <strong>